Touching Masterpieces

Touching MasterPieces

Do NOT touch”. It’s the first rule that we encounter when we enter to any museum. That’s a reasonable rule, as the pieces can be studied and contemplated with just our eyes and touching them can damage them in the long term.

But not all of us can use their eyes to appreciate art, and touching is their only way to examine these pieces of art.

That’s the reason why NeuroDigital Technologies  decided to jump into this venture with Geometry Prague, the Leontinka Foundation and the National Gallery of Prague. “Touching Masterpieces” is a project on which we recreated three different art works in virtual reality: Michelangelo’s David, Venus de Milo and the bust of Nefertiti. Now, with our haptic glove Avatar VR the blind and the visually impaired can ‘see’ and enjoy the art on these three pieces.

Our common project, Touching Masterpieces, received several awards: 1 Silver and 1 Bronze in Digital Craft, 1 Bronze in Innovation and 1 Bronze in Health! It also got shortlisted in 10 other categories. Incredible results!

Includes

  • Pair of Avatar VR Gloves (left & right)
  • Wrist adaptor for VIVE Trackers
  • Bluetooth 4.0 USB

Requirements

  • Avatar VR + VIVE Trackers
  • Gloveone + VIVE Trackers

CANNES LIONS 2018 FESTIVAL AWARDS

DIGITAL CRAFT

SILVER

DIGITAL CRAFT

BRONZE

INNOVATION

BRONZE

HEALTH

BRONZE
+10 SHORTLISTS

Head of Nefertiti

1345 B.C. BY THUTMOSE.
ON DISPLAY AT NEUES MUSEUM IN BERLIN, GERMANY.

The bust of Nefertiti, one of

Egypt’s most famous queens, was

in the Egyptian desert for more

than 3300 years before its

discovery in 1912 – and she has

been captivating the public with

her beautiful and disconcertingly

modern appearance ever since.

 

“Suddenly we had in our hands the

most alive Egyptian artwork. You

cannot describe it with words.

You must see it.”

LUDWIG BORCHARDT, HEAD OF THE GERMAN ARCHAEOLOGICAL TEAM

Venus de Milo

1345 B.C. BY ALEXANDROS OF ANTIOCH.
ON DISPLAY AT THE LOUVRE MUSEUM IN PARIS, FRANCE.

This graceful figure of a goddess

has fascinated art lovers for almost

two centuries, ever since its

discovery, in 1820, on the small

Greek island of Melos.

 

“The Venus de Milo is an accidental

surrealist masterpiece. Her lack of

arms makes her strange and

dreamlike. She is perfect but

imperfect, beautiful but broken—

the body as a ruin. That sense of

enigmatic incompleteness has

transformed an ancient

work of art into a modern one.”

JONATAS JONES, THE GUARDIAN”S ART CRITIC

David

1504 A.D. BY MICHELANGELO.
ON DISPLAY AT GALLERIA DELL’ ACCADEMIA IN FLORENCE, ITALY.

Michelangelo’s David is the best

expression of Renaissance

humanism, the triumph of man as

a rational being.

 

“When all was finished, it cannot

be denied that this work has

carried off the palm from all other

statues, modern or ancient, Greek

or Latin; no other artwork is equal

to it in any respect, with such just

proportion, beauty and excellence

did Michelangelo finish it”

GIORGIO VASARI, THE RENAISSANCE PAINTER AND THE FOUNDER OF ART HISTORY AS SUCH

HOW IT WORK

01. SET-UP

With the gloves on, the blind person controls
the virtual hand in virtual space – 360º.

02. EXPERIENCE

When the virtual hand touches the 3D object, the

technology identifies it and sends feedback to the

gloves in the form of vibration.

03. FEEDBACK

The blind person can ‘see’ the shape of the 3D

virtual object by following the vibrations they

receive through the gloves

The blind only feel the vibration when they touch the 3D object

The object is in a Virtual Space and the blind person can not see on-screen what is happening.

So, if the digital hand gets inside the 3D model, the vibrations are not sent. The same happens if the virtual hand is too far from the 3D

object. Basically, the blind only feel the vibration if they touch the object (like an outline on the surface that vibrates when they touch it).

Touching the object

– vibration sent

Not touching the object

– no vibration sent

Inside the object

– no vibration sent